Katrina, our senior London garden designer recently visited Copenhagen. Whilst there, she choose to spend time in the Denmark design Museum. Here is her account of the visit.

Garden Designer in Leigh on Sea winds up in Copenhagen

Garden Designer in Leigh on Sea winds up in Copenhagen

 

Girl about town

I was on a cruise with my family, this garden designer from Leigh on Sea found herself alone in Copenhagen for the day. A city packed full of wonderful architecture and Christmas markets I was happy enough just walking the streets. I’ve never been one for visiting religious buildings in particular, nor did the prospect of art gallery particulars tempt me that day. Given the strong influence Scandinavian design had on mid century styles, the Danish Museum of Art and design seemed a great choice.

The design of today

The first room, is packed full of contemporary design. For this garden designer in Leigh on Sea, it was fantastic to view the simplicity the Danish design is renowned for. New materials, and, in some cases they Avent guard shapes fill the main room and the small anterooms. This area deals with how the cultivation of the expressiveness and communicative potential everyday objects came into full bloom post-modernism in the 1980s. The design decade continues to character tries today’s design for our body, home, workplace and free time. It shows that we demand more functionality from the object we live with. They need to offer emotional satisfaction and sensory engagement. They need to build identity and status. Interior design objects signal both ascetic style and economic prowess. Most Danish companies and industry build in design as part of the product development and as a strategic and value creating factor. In the 1990s, globalisation, Digital technology and the need to sustainable solutions were monkey opportunities and challenges that designers faced. It’s shit get up the gear. Need to change at more criteria. So the first time, diversity, luxury design, Recycling solutions, digital products the conceptual craft appears side-by-side. National characteristics began to weaken as production started to cross continents more frequently. And the desire for home-made unique items began to grow.

Garden Designer in Leigh on Sea winds up in Copenhagen

Today’s design reaches across genres and materials

The history of design

The next room began the journey of the history of design,. Starting with okay, it talks about the 1851 great exhibition in London and help that became a springboard around the world for displaying the latest machines, tools and applied arts. During this time the world shrunk with improved transport and communication. Pre-both world wars people believed that any competition between enlightened nations should be based on design, art, knowledge and good taste. Prince Albert, was at the forefront of this vision of enlightenment. This is when the Victoria and Albert Museum was born. The Danish equivalent, design Museum Denmark was established in 1890 and demonstrates exhibits and objects acquired from the very first world exhibitions. Different arts and craft exhibits are shown as well as photographs spearheaded by William Morris. This is particularly close to my heart, as Earth designs started in Walthamstow which is where William Morris was from. We travel all the way through the history of design, past art deco, into post modernism, looking at Japanese influences and world trends.

From the Great exhibition to Postmodernism.

From the Great exhibition to Postmodernism.

The corridor of chairs

By far my favourite area of the exhibition. The space is greeted with a quote “the chair is a very difficult object. Everyone who is ever tried to make one knows that. There are endless possibilities and many Problems-the chair has to be light, it has to be strong, it has to be comfortable. It is almost easier to build a skyscraper at the new chair” Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.A chair is an acid test of designers and one of the favourite objects of desire historians. The design brief is simple enough; instructor that can support a body about 42 cm above the ground.

The corridor of chairs

The corridor of chairs

Show me your chair and I will tell you who you are

The chair affects and reflects the body it has to carry, with arms, legs, seat, and back. It is anthropomorphic. It’s invest the person sitting in it with status and identity and gives the designer the power of expression. This was beautifully demonstrated in the corridor of chairs. Chairs are one of the most iconic items form any era, revealing so much about the age and society in which it was created. So many different chairs give individuals power, authority and dignity. Think about a throne, academic chair, a stall, adjudges bench, episcopal throne. Denmark became world-famous but it’s many takes on modern shares in the 20th century. It is what they are famous for in the history of design. Many famous Danish furniture designers have measured, studied, and drawn inspiration from the historic furniture in the museum. In the corridor of chairs, Each share is placed in a frame as an individual at work, however, all the chairs are presented in proximity to the close relatives. All wooden chairs are together, all tubular chairs are together, all in graved chairs et cetera.
Each chair is placed in the frame as an individual at work, however, all the chairs are presented in proximity to the close relatives. All wooden chairs are together, all tubular chairs are together, all great chairs et cetera.

Chairs are grouped next to their closes relatives

Chairs are grouped next to their closes relatives

 

The little black dress

The last area of the museum that I visited was an exhibition of the fashion of Eric Mortensen. The little black dress pioneered by the famous French fashion could Siri Coco Chanel has stood the test of time. Described as a little black dress it is a cocktail or evening dress is short, informal all-round useful. It is the mainstay of any woman’s wardrobe. Eric Mortensen love black fabrics that every kind so the little black dress became one of his signature formats.

Also famous for being a little eccentric, Mortensen was often known to apply transparent fabrics to his garments. Using these with stainable fabrics such as velvet , His outfits often became risque and seductive.

Transparent fabrics give a seductive unprovactive fashion

Transparent fabrics give a seductive unprovactive fashion

 

 

Thoroughly enjoyed it

What I thought might be parochial slightly stuffy was actually excellent museum. Up-to-the-minute, and yet solid and informative, I could quite easily have spent the whole day here. Because of the size of the museum (in comparison to somewhere like the Victoria and Albert Museum) it was less intimidating, and allowed a more general overview of design history. The objects in the collection of presented beautifully and The queue oration of the museum is well worth a visit.